Court Reporter Guide for Indiana

Court Reporters have a huge role to play in the American Judicial System, maintaining the integrity of the judicial process. They are required to record courtroom proceedings and report in a responsible manner. Court Reporters are also known as Stenographers or Shorthand Reporters. Court Reporters are required to complete two to four years Associate or Bachelor’s Degree in the areas of legal terminology, transcriptions, and criminal procedure. Some of the courses they cover are medical terminology, machine shorthand, transcription, and court procedures.

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To perform their duties, court reporters use a variety of equipment, which in the state of Indiana, is not uniform. Court reporters working in Indiana also do not possess same educational and training credentials. While their training and experience may vary, they nonetheless, are committed to the excellence of the profession by creating a true and accurate record of the court proceedings. In order to work as a court reporter in Indiana, you have to complete the following steps.

Step 1: Get the Necessary Education

To work as a court reporter in Indiana, the Court Reporter’s Handbook compiled by the Indiana Court Reporter Task Force is your starting point. It lists down all basic educational requirements, other requirements, and the skills you need to work as a court reporter in the state. For example, it states that you should have an Associate’s degree and some law experience to work as a court reporter.

Step 2: Get Certification

You will also need to get certified from a professional organization like the NCRA or the NVRA. The former offers the Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) certification, while the latter offers the Certified Verbatim Reporter (CVR) credentials to aspiring court reporters. Both certifications have different requirements, so make sure you do your research properly.

Step 3: Find a Job

Once you have met all the prerequisites, start looking for a job. It is a good idea to join the Indiana Court Reporter’s Association (INCRA) because a membership can help you land a job.

Step 4: Continuing Education Credits

To maintain your certification, you have to remain updated with the latest developments in the field by taking continuing education credits. The continuing education requirements will vary as per the certification you possess.

How to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana
How to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana

Should I Become a Court Reporter in Indiana?

If you want to become a court reporter in Indiana, read the following details.

Educational RequirementsPostsecondary nondegree award
Area of StudyPreparing transcripts, legal procedures, grammar
Licensure/CertificationCertification and License is mandatory
Experience/TrainingShort-term on-the-job training
Key SkillsListening skills, good concentration, detail oriented, fast writing, good grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary
Annual Mean Salary – Indiana (2021)$44,290 per year
Job Outlook – Indiana (2018 – 2028)7%

Sources: O*Net Online and US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Requirements to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana

First things first, there are no college level education requirements in order to become a court reporter in Indiana. You need to have a high school diploma or GED though. Neither unlike many other states, you need to be licensed or certified to become a court reporter in Indiana. That, however does not mean that anyone can work as a court reporter in the State. In order to produce accurate and true record of proceedings you need to have certain skills to perform your job efficiently. They are:

  • Basic familiarity with court processes and procedures
  • Fast typing speed
  • Language translation and interpretation skills

If you want to brighten your employment prospects, then consider acquiring the following too:

  • Associate degree in court reporting
  • Law experience
  • 2 years of study and practice with a shorthand stenotype

Education Options

For post high school educational credentials consider enrolling yourself in a certificate, diploma or associate degree program in your local community college or technical institute. However, before enrollment, make sure that the program is approved by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA).

Familiarity with Indiana Laws and Regulations

One of the best ways of finding a court reporter’s job in Indiana is to join a professional body. Consider joining the Indiana Court Reporters Association (INCRA) and the Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (ISRA).

Some of the many benefits of joining such organizations are:

  • Updated information on employment opportunities and vacancies
  • Updates on laws affecting the court reporting field
  • Notification of upcoming events and conventions
  • Professional networking opportunities

Look for a Court Reporter’s Job In Indiana

One of the best ways of finding a court reporter’s job in Indiana is to join a professional body. Consider joining the Indiana Court Reporters Association (INCRA) and the Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (ISRA).

Some of the many benefits of joining such organizations are:

  • Updated information on employment opportunities and vacancies
  • Updates on laws affecting the court reporting field
  • Notification of upcoming events and conventions
  • Professional networking opportunities

How Much Do Court Reporters Earn in Indiana

According to May 2020 statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), court reporters in Indiana earned the annual mean salary of $40,790. What you will actually end up earning depends heavily on your expertise, years of experience and location. Also, if you work more, you are likely to earn more too.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana?

According to the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the minimum time it takes to become a court reporter is 28 months. To master in stenotype skills, it takes a maximum of 33 months. So, at the most the maximum time it takes to complete a degree in Court Reporting is 44 months. Once the degree is completed, it’s mandatory to get certification from NCRA.

Career Prospects

O*Net Online forecasts a 7% increase in employment opportunities for court reporters in Indiana between 2018 and 2028. The corresponding national average for this occupation is 3%. $44,290 was the mean annual salary of court reporters in Indiana as per BLS in 2021. Below are the top 5 highest paying states for this occupation in the US in 2021.

Highest Paying US States for Court Reporters and Simultaneous Captioners, 2020

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