How to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana

A court reporter’s responsibilities may be overlooked but the truth of the matter is that no judicial system can efficiently function without them. Court reporters produce a printed transcription of the proceedings that is accurate, organized and produced in the shortest period of time.

To perform their duties, court reporters use a variety of equipment, which in the state of Indiana, is not uniform. Court reporters working in Indiana also do not possess same educational and training credentials. While their training and experience may vary, they nonetheless, are committed to the excellence of the profession by creating a true and accurate record of the court proceedings.

How to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana
How to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana

Requirements to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana

First things first, there are no college level education requirements in order to become a court reporter in Indiana. You need to have a high school diploma or GED though. Neither unlike many other states, you need to be licensed or certified to become a court reporter in Indiana. That, however does not mean that anyone can work as a court reporter in the State. In order to produce accurate and true record of proceedings you need to have certain skills to perform your job efficiently. They are:

  • Basic familiarity with court processes and procedures
  • Fast typing speed
  • Language translation and interpretation skills

If you want to brighten your employment prospects, then consider acquiring the following too:

  • Associate degree in court reporting
  • Law experience
  • 2 years of study and practice with a shorthand stenotype

Education Options

For post high school educational credentials consider enrolling yourself in a certificate, diploma or associate degree program in your local community college or technical institute. However, before enrollment, make sure that the program is approved by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA).

Familiarity with Indiana Laws and Regulations

One of the best ways of finding a court reporter’s job in Indiana is to join a professional body. Consider joining the Indiana Court Reporters Association (INCRA) and the Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (ISRA).

Some of the many benefits of joining such organizations are:

  • Updated information on employment opportunities and vacancies
  • Updates on laws affecting the court reporting field
  • Notification of upcoming events and conventions
  • Professional networking opportunities

Look for a Court Reporter’s Job In Indiana

One of the best ways of finding a court reporter’s job in Indiana is to join a professional body. Consider joining the Indiana Court Reporters Association (INCRA) and the Indiana Shorthand Reporters Association (ISRA).

Some of the many benefits of joining such organizations are:

  • Updated information on employment opportunities and vacancies
  • Updates on laws affecting the court reporting field
  • Notification of upcoming events and conventions
  • Professional networking opportunities

How Much Do Court Reporters Earn in Indiana

According to May 2017 statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), court reporters earned the annual mean salary of $37,820. What you will actually end up earning depends heavily on your expertise, years of experience and location. Also, if you work more, you are likely to earn more too.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Court Reporter in Indiana?

This field is not as stringently regulated in Indiana as it is in other states. Therefore, there is no specific time under which you will become a court reporter in the state. A lot will depend on how quickly you find a court reporter’s position and fulfill your employment requirements and qualifications.

Career Prospects

According to May 2017 statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 730 court reporters in the state. The same source predicts a 3 percent national job growth in this field from 2016 to 2026. So, while there will not be an abundance of court reporters’ jobs in the coming years, job vacancies will come up steadily. And since competition will be stiff, make sure you qualify for more than minimum requirements to stand out as the best applicant for the job.